Wolf Delisting Challenges Demonstrate Need for an Improved Framework for Conserving Intraspecific Variation under the Endangered Species Act.

Carlos Carroll, Daniel J. Rohlf, Bridgett M. Vonholdt, Adrian Treves, Sarah A. Hendricks

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent advances in genomics have increased our understanding of geographic patterns of intraspecific variation and the importance of this variation in enhancing species' potential to adapt to novel threats. However, as part of an effort to limit the scope of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the US government has proposed the removal of the gray wolf from the list of protected species on the basis of a claim that the statute permits a species to be declared recovered given the existence of a single presently secure population. We rebut this interpretation and propose a framework for the conservation of adaptive potential that builds on current agency practice in delineating subspecific recovery units and reconciles the definition of significance in the statute's "distinct population segment"and "significant portion of range"clauses. Such a coordinated policy would enhance the ESA's effectiveness in stemming loss of biodiversity in the face of climate change and other factors altering Earth's ecosystems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-84
Number of pages12
JournalBioScience
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Keywords

  • Canis lupus
  • adaptive potential
  • conservation genomics
  • distinct population segment
  • recovery planning

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