Willingness-to-pay and the perfect safari: Valuation and cultural evaluation of safari package attributes in the Serengeti and Tanzanian Northern Circuit

Nitin Sekar, Jack M. Weiss, Andrew P. Dobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Governments and NGOs worldwide aim to develop models of tourism that realize the economic, environmental, and cultural ideals of ecotourism. This is true in the national parks of the Northern Safari Circuit of Tanzania, which attract hundreds of thousands of tourists annually. To better understand what tourists to Tanzania were willing to pay for various attributes of their tour package, we used a linear mixed effects model to analyze what attributes of 72 tour packages from 32 tour operators contributed to the price of tour packages. We found that the number of days spent on tour, the number of days spent in the Serengeti, the type of accommodation (basic camping versus lodges or luxury tents), the mode of transport into the park (flying versus driving), and the inclusion of cultural tourism helped predict the price of a tour package. Our findings suggest that tour operators charge 92% more for a day in the Serengeti than other Northern Circuit attractions, but we do not examine what happens to the additional rent generated by the Serengeti. Additionally, the utility of cultural tourism in attracting foreign tourists presents both tremendous opportunities and potential challenges to efforts to realize culturally sensitive ecotourism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-41
Number of pages8
JournalEcological Economics
Volume97
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Keywords

  • Cultural tourism
  • Ecotourism
  • Serengeti National Park
  • Willingness-to-pay

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Willingness-to-pay and the perfect safari: Valuation and cultural evaluation of safari package attributes in the Serengeti and Tanzanian Northern Circuit'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this