Who pays for government? descriptive representationb and exploitative revenue sources

Michael W. Sances, Hye Young You

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examine US city governments' use of fines and court fees for local revenue, a policy that disproportionately affects black voters, and the connections between this policy and black representation. Using data on over 9,000 cities, we show that the use of fines as revenue is common and that it is robustly related to the share of city residents who are black. We also find that black representation on city councils diminishes the connection between black population and fines revenue. Our findings speak to the potential of descriptive representation to alleviate biases in city policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1090-1094
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Politics
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Who pays for government? descriptive representationb and exploitative revenue sources'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this