What were you worried about? Actors' concerns about revealing fears and insecurities relative to observers' reactions

Dena M. Gromet, Emily Pronin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

In three studies, participants provided information about themselves and/or received information provided by a peer describing either personal fears and insecurities or related (but non-negative) information. The results suggest that when individuals disclose fears and insecurities, they think that others will like them less than those others in fact do. Studies 2 and 3 explored two potential sources of this effect. One involved disclosers' heightened perceptions of the negativity of their disclosures; the other involved disclosers' failure to recognize the extent to which recipients' liking for them was influenced by the apparent honesty and genuineness of their disclosures (rather than the negativity of those disclosures). The second of these two sources was supported. Implications for self-disclosure and intimacy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-364
Number of pages23
JournalSelf and Identity
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Keywords

  • Disclosure
  • Honesty
  • Intimacy
  • Self-other
  • Self-presentation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'What were you worried about? Actors' concerns about revealing fears and insecurities relative to observers' reactions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this