Volatile compounds characteristic of sinus-related bacteria and infected sinus mucus: Analysis by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

George Preti, Erica Thaler, C. William Hanson, Michelle Troy, Jason Eades, Alan Gelperin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

Volatile compounds from human breath are a potential source of information for disease diagnosis. Breath may include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating in the nasal sinuses. If the sinuses are infected, disease-specific volatiles may enter exhaled air. Sinus infections are commonly caused by several known bacteria. We examined the volatiles characteristic of infectious bacteria in culture using solid-phase microextraction to collect and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as well as gas chromatography with flame photometric detection to separate and analyze the resulting VOCs. Infected sinus mucus samples were also collected and their VOCs examined. Similar characteristic volatiles were seen from both cultures of individual "pure" bacteria and several mucus samples. However, the relative amounts of characteristic VOCs from individual bacteria differ greatly between cultures and sinus mucus. New compounds, not seen in culture were also seen in some mucus samples. Our results suggest an important role for growth substrate and environment. Our data further suggests that in some sinus mucus samples identification of bacteria-specific volatiles is possible and can suggest the identity of an infecting organism to physicians. Knowledge of these bacteria-related volatiles is necessary to create electronic nose-based, volatile-specific sensors for non-invasive examination for suspected sinus infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2011-2018
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Chromatography B: Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume877
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2009
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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