Use of black English and racial discrimination in urban housing markets: New methods and findings

Douglas S. Massey, Garvey Lundy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

219 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors argue that racial discrimination in housing markets need not involve personal contact between agents and renters. Research indicates that American can infer race from speech patterns alone, thus offering rental agents an opportunity to discriminate over the phone. To test this hypothesis, the authors designed an audit study to compare male and female speakers of White Middle-Class English, Black Accented English, and Black English Vernacular. The study was conducted during the spring of 1999 in the Philadelphia metropolitan area. The authors found significant racial discrimination that was often exacerbated by class and gender. Poor black women, in particular, experienced the greatest discrimination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-469
Number of pages18
JournalUrban Affairs Review
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

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