Tracking the flow of ideas through the programming languages literature

Michael Greenberg, Kathleen Fisher, David Walker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

How have conferences like ICFP, OOPSLA, PLDI, and POPL evolved over the last 20 years? Did generalizing the Call for Papers for OOPSLA in 2007 or changing the name of the umbrella conference to SPLASH in 2010 have any effect on the kinds of papers published there? How do POPL and PLDI papers compare, topic-wise? Is there related work that I am missing? Have the ideas in O'Hearn's classic paper on separation logic shifted the kinds of papers that appear in POPL? Does a proposed program committee cover the range of submissions expected for the conference? If we had better tools for analyzing the programming language literature, we might be able to answer these questions and others like them in a data-driven way. In this paper, we explore how topic modeling, a branch of machine learning, might help the programming language community better understand our literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages, SNAPL 2015
EditorsThomas Ball, Rastislav Bodik, Benjamin S. Lerner, Greg Morrisett, Shriram Krishnamurthi
PublisherSchloss Dagstuhl- Leibniz-Zentrum fur Informatik GmbH, Dagstuhl Publishing
Pages140-155
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9783939897804
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015
Event1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages, SNAPL 2015 - Asilomar, United States
Duration: May 3 2015May 6 2015

Publication series

NameLeibniz International Proceedings in Informatics, LIPIcs
Volume32
ISSN (Print)1868-8969

Other

Other1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages, SNAPL 2015
CountryUnited States
CityAsilomar
Period5/3/155/6/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software

Keywords

  • Irony
  • Programming languages literature
  • Topic models

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Tracking the flow of ideas through the programming languages literature'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Greenberg, M., Fisher, K., & Walker, D. (2015). Tracking the flow of ideas through the programming languages literature. In T. Ball, R. Bodik, B. S. Lerner, G. Morrisett, & S. Krishnamurthi (Eds.), 1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages, SNAPL 2015 (pp. 140-155). (Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics, LIPIcs; Vol. 32). Schloss Dagstuhl- Leibniz-Zentrum fur Informatik GmbH, Dagstuhl Publishing. https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2015.140