Timing is everything: Changes in presentation rate have opposite effects on auditory and visual implicit statistical learning

Lauren L. Emberson, Christopher M. Conway, Morten H. Christiansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Implicit statistical learning (ISL) is exclusive to neither a particular sensory modality nor a single domain of processing. Even so, differences in perceptual processing may substantially affect learning across modalities. In three experiments, statistically equivalent auditory and visual familiarizations were presented under different timing conditions that either facilitated or disrupted temporal processing (fast or slow presentation rates). We find an interaction of rate and modality of presentation: At fast rates, auditory ISL was superior to visual. However, at slow presentation rates, the opposite pattern of results was found: Visual ISL was superior to auditory. Thus, we find that changes to presentation rate differentially affect ISL across sensory modalities. Additional experiments confirmed that this modality-specific effect was not due to cross-modal interference or attentional manipulations. These findings suggest that ISL is rooted in modality-specific, perceptually based processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1021-1040
Number of pages20
JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume64
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Physiology (medical)

Keywords

  • Implicit learning
  • Multisensory processing
  • Perceptual grouping
  • Statistical learning
  • Temporal processing

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