The role of secondary structures in the functioning of 3′ untranslated regions of mRNA: A review of functions of 3′ UTRs’ secondary structures and hypothetical involvement of secondary structures in cytoplasmic polyadenylation in Drosophila

Mariya Zhukova, Paul Schedl, Yulii V. Shidlovskii

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) of mRNAs have many functions, including mRNA processing and transport, translational regulation, and mRNA degradation and stability. These different functions require cis-elements in 3′ UTRs that can be either sequence motifs or RNA structures. Here we review the role of secondary structures in the functioning of 3′ UTRs and discuss some of the trans-acting factors that interact with these secondary structures in eukaryotic organisms. We propose potential participation of 3′-UTR secondary structures in cytoplasmic polyadenylation in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Because the secondary structures of 3′ UTRs are essential for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, their disruption leads to a wide range of disorders, including cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Trans-acting factors, such as STAU1 and nucleolin, which interact with 3′-UTR secondary structures of target transcripts, influence the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and tumor metastasis, suggesting that they are possible therapeutic targets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2300099
JournalBioEssays
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology

Keywords

  • Drosophila melanogaster
  • G-quadruplex
  • Orb
  • gene expression regulation
  • stem-loop structure

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