The role of retributive justice and the use of international criminal tribunals in post-conflict reconciliation

Mengyao Li, Bernhard Leidner, Nebojša Petrović, Seyed Nima Orazani, Mostafa Salari Rad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Four experiments examined people's responses to intergroup violence either committed or suffered by their own group. Experiment 1 demonstrated that Serbs who strongly glorified Serbia were more supportive of future violence against, and less willing to reconcile with, Bosniaks after reading about Serbian victimization by Bosniaks rather than Serbian transgressions against Bosniaks. Replicating these effects with Americans in the context of American–Iranian tensions, Experiment 2 further showed that demands for retributive justice explained why high glorifiers showed asymmetrical reactions to ingroup victimization vs. perpetration. Again in the Serb and the American context, respectively, Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated that post-conflict international criminal tribunals can help satisfy victim group members' desire for retributive justice, and thereby reduce their support for future violence and increase their willingness to reconcile with the perpetrator group. The role of retributive justice and the use of international criminal justice in intergroup conflict (reduction) are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)O133-O151
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Keywords

  • conflict resolution
  • ingroup identification/glorification
  • intergroup violence
  • justice
  • reconciliation

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