The perils of working at home: IRB "mission creep" as context and content for an ethnography of disciplinary knowledges

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    81 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Among kinds of fieldwork "at home," ethnographies of higher education inevitably draw on informal gleanings of everyday insider experience. Such informality is implicitly outlawed by federal human-subjects research regulations, which presume a clinical biomedical model that formally demarcates research from other activities. Intricately implicated in these circumstances, this article describes a comparative investigation into the methodologically embedded ethical conventions of anthropology and related disciplines for which institutional review board (IRB) participation itself became inadvertently informative, work that also reveals a conflict between the ethics of human-subjects protections (confidentiality) and of collegial exchange (citation).

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)482-491
    Number of pages10
    JournalAmerican Ethnologist
    Volume33
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 2006

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Anthropology

    Keywords

    • Disciplinarity
    • Ethnography of academic life and higher education
    • Institutional review boards (IRB)
    • Mission creep
    • Participant-observation fieldwork
    • Research ethics
    • Unfunded research

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The perils of working at home: IRB "mission creep" as context and content for an ethnography of disciplinary knowledges'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this