The new war correspondents: The rise of civic media curation in urban warfare

Andrés Monroy-Hernández, Danah Boyd, Emre Kiciman, Munmun De Choudhury, Scott Counts

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we examine the information sharing practices of people living in cities amid armed conflict. We describe the volume and frequency of microblogging activity on Twitter from four cities afflicted by the Mexican Drug War, showing how citizens use social media to alert one another and to comment on the violence that plagues their communities. We then investigate the emergence of civic media "curators," individuals who act as "war correspondents" by aggregating and disseminating information to large numbers of people on social media. We conclude by outlining the implications of our observations for the design of civic media systems in wartime.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCSCW 2013 - Proceedings of the 2013 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work
Pages1443-1452
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event2013 2nd ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2013 - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Feb 23 2013Feb 27 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW

Conference

Conference2013 2nd ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2013
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period2/23/132/27/13

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Keywords

  • Civic media
  • Crisis informatics
  • Crowdsourcing
  • Curation
  • Latin america
  • Mexico
  • Microblogging
  • News
  • Social computing
  • Social media
  • Twitter
  • War

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