The effect of augmented driver behavior on freeway traffic flow

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper investigates the possible virtue of the modification of longitudinal and lane-change behaviors of drivers by intelligent cruise control systems that augment individual driver behavior by enforcing minimum separation between vehicles. Such systems would not only reduce collisions but may also improve traffic flow by reducing the frequency of bottlenecks on freeways. This hypothesis is tested using a modified microsimulation of a length of freeway in Los Angeles County. A transit-oriented minimum time headway controller is compared to a traditional minimum separation intelligent cruise controller. The results show that using a fixed distance policy to control the separation tends to keep the flow more stable during peak periods and reduces travel times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication53rd Annual Transportation Research Forum, TRF 2012
Pages1215-1244
Number of pages30
Volume2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Event53rd Annual Transportation Research Forum, TRF 2012 - Tampa, FL, United States
Duration: Mar 15 2012Mar 17 2012

Other

Other53rd Annual Transportation Research Forum, TRF 2012
CountryUnited States
CityTampa, FL
Period3/15/123/17/12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Transportation

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  • Cite this

    Chacon, S., & Kornhauser, A. L. (2012). The effect of augmented driver behavior on freeway traffic flow. In 53rd Annual Transportation Research Forum, TRF 2012 (Vol. 2, pp. 1215-1244)