The bias blind spot: Perceptions of bias in self versus others

Emily Pronin, Daniel Y. Lin, Lee Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

452 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three studies suggest that individuals see the existence and operation of cognitive and motivational biases much more in others than in themselves. Study 1 provides evidence from three surveys that people rate themselves as less subject to various biases than the "average American, " classmates in a seminar, and fellow airport travelers. Data from the third survey further suggest that such claims arise from the interplay among availability biases and self-enhancement motives. Participants in one follow-up study who showed the better-than-average bias insisted that their self-assessments were accurate and objective even after reading a description of how they could have been affected by the relevant bias. Participants in a final study reported their peer's self-serving attributions regarding test performance to be biased but their own similarly self-serving attributions to be free of bias. The relevance of these phenomena to naïve realism and to conflict, misunderstanding, and dispute resolution is discussed. ̀ 2002 by the Society for Personality and social Psychology, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-381
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

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