The bias blind spot: Perceptions of bias in self versus others

Emily Pronin, Daniel Y. Lin, Lee Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

428 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three studies suggest that individuals see the existence and operation of cognitive and motivational biases much more in others than in themselves. Study 1 provides evidence from three surveys that people rate themselves as less subject to various biases than the "average American, " classmates in a seminar, and fellow airport travelers. Data from the third survey further suggest that such claims arise from the interplay among availability biases and self-enhancement motives. Participants in one follow-up study who showed the better-than-average bias insisted that their self-assessments were accurate and objective even after reading a description of how they could have been affected by the relevant bias. Participants in a final study reported their peer's self-serving attributions regarding test performance to be biased but their own similarly self-serving attributions to be free of bias. The relevance of these phenomena to naïve realism and to conflict, misunderstanding, and dispute resolution is discussed. ̀ 2002 by the Society for Personality and social Psychology, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-381
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2002
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

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