Structures for organic diode lasers and optical properties of organic semiconductors under intense optical and electrical excitations

V. G. Kozlov, G. Parthasarathy, Paul E. Burrows, V. B. Khalfin, J. Wang, S. Y. Chou, S. R. Forrest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

123 Scopus citations

Abstract

The challenges to realizing diode lasers based on thin films of organic semiconductors are primarily related to low charge carrier mobility in these materials. This not only limits the thickness of organic films to ≤100 nm in electrically pumped devices, but it also leads to changes in the optical properties of organic films induced by the large number of carriers trapped in the materials subjected to an intense electrical excitation. We describe organic waveguide laser structures composed of thin organic films and transparent indium-tin-oxide electrodes. These waveguides allow for efficient injection of an electrical current into the organic layers and provide for low optical losses required in a laser. The changes in the optical properties of organic thin films induced by electrical excitation are studied using electroluminescence and pump and probe spectroscopy. Induced transparency and absorption observed in the organic materials may be related to triplet excitons or trapped charge carriers. Pump-induced absorption is also observed in organic films under quasi-CW optical excitation. These effects must be taken into account both in the design of organic diode laser structures and in the selection of charge transporting materials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-26
Number of pages9
JournalIEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Structures for organic diode lasers and optical properties of organic semiconductors under intense optical and electrical excitations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this