Stereotypes and prejudice create workplace discrimination

Susan T. Fiske, Tiane L. Lee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

John Williams is a black American. On his first day of work at a new job at a mid-size print advertising firm, he arrived early to set up his office, only to find that his “office” was not with the other two new recruits but in the basement, in what was previously a janitor's closet. Displayed prominently on his computer was a noose. Kevin Nakamoto is a Japanese-American, entry-level market analyst who recently transferred to another office. In deciding where to eat for lunch, one of his new co-workers asked if Kevin would mind if they did not have Chinese food. Later that day, another co-worker came by to introduce herself. As they chatted, she assumed that Kevin would be helpful in computer consulting and she volunteered that no one would mind if he was a social loner. Mary Carpenter is a white, 22-year-old interested in construction. For the past six months, she has been unsuccessfully searching for a job. Though she has submitted applications to all jobs for which she felt qualified, she has had no luck. In the same time period, she saw her male friends receive offers in the same field, so she knows the demand is definitely there. McKenzie Wilkes is a married, mother-of-two, successful attorney at a large firm. She is one of the most feared litigators in the courtroom and one of the most referred among her clients. Despite her impressive resumé, she was turned down as a partner at the firm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDiversity at Work
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages13-52
Number of pages40
ISBN (Electronic)9780511753725
ISBN (Print)9780521860307
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

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    Fiske, S. T., & Lee, T. L. (2008). Stereotypes and prejudice create workplace discrimination. In Diversity at Work (pp. 13-52). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511753725.004