Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations

Swetaprovo Chaudhuri, Fujia Wu, Chung King Law

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a ReT,f0.5 scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given ReT,f, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by ReT,M0.5 irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number033005
JournalPhysical Review E - Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 9 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Statistical and Nonlinear Physics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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