Scaling limit and cube-root fluctuations in SOS surfaces above a wall

Pietro Caputo, Eyal Lubetzky, Fabio Martinelli, Allan Sly, Fabio Lucio Toninelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Consider the classical (2 + 1)-dimensional Solid-On-Solid model above a hard wall on an L×L box of ℤ2. The model describes a crystal surface by assigning a nonnegative integer height ηx to each site x in the box and 0 heights to its boundary. The probability of a surface configuration η is proportional to exp(-βH(η)), where β is the inverse-temperature and H(η) sums the absolute values of height differences between neighboring sites. We give a full description of the shape of the SOS surface for low enough temperatures. First we show that with high probability (w.h.p.) the height of almost all sites is concentrated on two levels, H(L) = z(1=4β) logLz and H(L)-1. Moreover, for most values of L the height is concentrated on the single value H(L). Next, we study the ensemble of level lines corresponding to the heights (H(L), H(L)-1,...). We prove that w.h.p. there is a unique macroscopic level line for each height. Furthermore, when taking a diverging sequence of system sizes Lk, the rescaled macroscopic level line at height H(Lk)-n has a limiting shape if the fractional parts of (1=4β) logLk converge to a noncritical value. The scaling limit is an explicit convex subset of the unit square Q and its boundary has a flat component on the boundary of Q. Finally, the highest macroscopic level line has L1/3+o(1)k fluctuations along the flat part of the boundary of its limiting shape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)991-995
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the European Mathematical Society
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mathematics(all)
  • Applied Mathematics

Keywords

  • Loop ensembles
  • Random surface models
  • SOS model
  • Scaling limits

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Scaling limit and cube-root fluctuations in SOS surfaces above a wall'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this