Re-inventing the homeland in the historiography of Frankish Greece: The fourth crusade and the legend of the Trojan War

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Abstract

A close reading of Western texts belonging to the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries reveals the process by which the legend of the Trojan War came to be associated with the conquest of Constantinople. After 1204, attempts in the Morea to re-work Benoît de Sainte-Maure's Roman de Troie attest to gradual changes in the relationship of the Frankish conquerors with their territories in the former Byzantine Empire, but also with their lands of origin. A parallel ideological transformation may be shown to have occurred within the Byzantine tradition. This evidence sheds light on the Late Medieval contexts in which were composed the Iliad of Constantine Hermoniakos, the anonymous, the Byzantine Iliad and Achilleid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-152
Number of pages33
JournalByzantine and Modern Greek Studies
Volume27
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Language and Linguistics
  • History
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

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