Rapid eruption of the Columbia River flood basalt and correlation with the mid-Miocene climate optimum

Jennifer Kasbohm, Blair Schoene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Flood basalts, the largest volcanic events in Earth history, are thought to drive global environmental change because they can emit large volumes of CO2 and SO2 over short geologic time scales. Eruption of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) has been linked to elevated atmospheric CO2 and global warming during the mid-Miocene climate optimum (MMCO) ~16 million years (Ma) ago. However, a causative relationship between volcanism and warming remains speculative, as the timing and tempo of CRBG eruptions is not well known. We use U-Pb geochronology on zircon-bearing volcanic ash beds intercalated within the basalt stratigraphy to build a high-resolution CRBG eruption record. Our data set shows that more than 95% of the CRBG erupted between 16.7 and 15.9 Ma, twice as fast as previous estimates. By suggesting a recalibration of the geomagnetic polarity time scale, these data indicate that the onset of flood volcanism is nearly contemporaneous with that of the MMCO.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberaat8223
JournalScience Advances
Volume4
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 19 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Rapid eruption of the Columbia River flood basalt and correlation with the mid-Miocene climate optimum'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this