Pulse lead/lag timing detection for adaptive feedback and control based on optical spike-timing-dependent plasticity

Mable P. Fok, Yue Tian, David Rosenbluth, Paul Richard Prucnal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Biological neurons perform information processing using a model called pulse processing, which is both computationally efficient and scalable, adopting the best features of both analog and digital computing. Implementing pulse processing with photonics can result in bandwidths that are billions of times faster than biological neurons and substantially faster than electronics. Neurons have the ability to learn and adapt their processing based on experience through a change in the strength of synaptic connections in response to spiking activity. This mechanism is called spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Functionally, STDP constitutes a mechanism in which strengths of connections between neurons are based on the timing and order between presynaptic spikes and postsynaptic spikes, essentially forming a pulse lead/lag timing detector that is useful in feedback control and adaptation. Here we report for the first time the demonstration of optical STDP that is useful in pulse lead/lag timing detection and apply it to automatic gain control of a photonic pulse processor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-421
Number of pages3
JournalOptics Letters
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

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