Personality Feedback and Situational Norms Can Control Stereotyping Processes

Susan T. Fiske, Holly M. Von Hendy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Impressions are influenced by motivations stemming primarily from the target (e.g., interdependence), 3rd parties (e.g., accountability or time pressure), or the self. The current studies investigate motivations stemming primarily from the self. In Study 1, Ss were given dispositional feedback about their abilities to categorize or to individuate. In Study 2, they were given situational information about the appropriate norms to categorize or to individuate. As predicted, dispositional feedback influenced low self-monitors, and situational information influenced high self-monitors. Both altered attention to potentially individuating category-inconsistent attributes as well as requests for additional information. Causal models further illuminated the mediating processes. These results suggest that people's flexible self-concepts are an important source of motivation in impression formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)577-596
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1992
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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