Peer effects, teacher incentives, and the impact of tracking: Evidence from a randomized evaluation in Kenya

Esther Duflo, Pascaline Dupas, Michael Kremer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

460 Scopus citations

Abstract

To the extent that students benefit from high-achieving peers, tracking will help strong students and hurt weak ones. However, all students may benefit if tracking allows teachers to better tailor their instruction level. Lower-achieving pupils are particularly likely to benefit from tracking when teachers have incentives to teach to the top of the distribution. We propose a simple model nesting these effects and test its implications in a randomized tracking experiment conducted with 121 primary schools in Kenya. While the direct effect of highachieving peers is positive, tracking benefited lower-achieving pupils indirectly by allowing teachers to teach to their level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1739-1774
Number of pages36
JournalAmerican Economic Review
Volume101
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

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