Other Germans: Black Germans and the politics of race, gender, and memory in the Third Reich

Research output: Book/ReportBook

118 Scopus citations

Abstract

It's hard to imagine an issue or image more riveting than Black Germans during the Third Reich. Yet accounts of their lives are virtually nonexistent, despite the fact that they lived through a regime dedicated to racial purity. Tina Campt's Other Germans tells the story of this largely forgotten group of individuals, with important distinctions from other accounts. Most strikingly, Campt centers her arguments on race, rather than anti-semitism. She also provides oral history as background for her study, interviewing two Black Germans for the book. In the end, the author comes face to face with an inevitable question: Is there a relationship between the history of Black Germans and those of other black communities? The answers to Campt's questions make Other Germans essential reading in the emerging study of what it meant to be black and German in the context of a society that looked at anyone with non-German blood as racially impure at best.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherUniversity of Michigan Press
Number of pages283
ISBN (Print)9780472031382
StatePublished - 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Arts and Humanities

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