On the discrepancy between background atmospheric ammonia gas measurements and the existence of acid sulfates as a dominant atmospheric aerosol

Ngar Cheung Lau, Robert J. Charlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

From the knowledge of NH4+ and H+ concentrations in precipitation (during rainy periods) and aerosol particles (when it is not raining) over the continental United States and in ocean water along the coasts, the atmospheric NH3 gas concentration can be inferred by assuming Henry's law equilibrium. It is found that this method gives NH3 concentrations which are in some cases considerably lower than those obtained through direct measurements. NH3 is thus estimated to vary geographically and temporally with the mid-west region being a dominant source of this trace gas. Oceanic areas exhibit much lower concentrations. These findings are consistent with the existence of acid sulfates as a dominant atmospheric aerosol, with soil chemistry and with previous investigations concerning with the association of the molecular forms of sulfate aerosols with air mass history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-478
Number of pages4
JournalAtmospheric Environment (1967)
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1977
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'On the discrepancy between background atmospheric ammonia gas measurements and the existence of acid sulfates as a dominant atmospheric aerosol'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this