Nanoscale instrumentation for measuring turbulence

Alexander Smits, Marcus Nils Hultmark

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

High Reynolds number flows display a wide range of scales, and, depending on the flow, the small scales can be of submicron size. Such small motions can also give rise, at a fixed point, to high frequency signals. To measure turbulence with good fidelity, therefore, we need instrumentation with very good spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we describe a suite of nanoscale sensors capable of measuring velocity and temperature with spatial and temporal resolutions that are at least one order of magnitude higher than that experienced using typical hot wire probes. These probes have led to new insights into high Reynolds number flows, and a number of examples of such insights will be given, including pipe flows, boundary layers, and isotropic turbulence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 19th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, AFMC 2014
PublisherAustralasian Fluid Mechanics Society
ISBN (Electronic)9780646596952
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event19th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, AFMC 2014 - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: Dec 8 2014Dec 11 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 19th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, AFMC 2014

Other

Other19th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, AFMC 2014
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period12/8/1412/11/14

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

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  • Cite this

    Smits, A., & Hultmark, M. N. (2014). Nanoscale instrumentation for measuring turbulence. In Proceedings of the 19th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, AFMC 2014 (Proceedings of the 19th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, AFMC 2014). Australasian Fluid Mechanics Society.