Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

Romain Fardel, Euan McLeod, Yu Cheng Tsai, Craig B. Arnold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-46
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Physics A: Materials Science and Processing
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)

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