Model form uncertainty quantification in turbulent combustion simulations

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Uncertainties in turbulent combustion simulations come from three distinct sources: uncertainties in operating parameters such as boundary conditions, uncertainties in model parameters such as chemical kinetic rates, and structural uncertainties associated with the form of the various component models. While the quantification of parametric uncertainty is relatively straightforward conceptually, the quantification of model form uncertainty requires the translation of physical assumptions into mathematical statements. In this work, two methods are proposed for quantifying such model form uncertainty directly from physics: hierarchical models and peer models. Hierarchical models use a higher-fidelity model to estimate the uncertainty in a lower-fidelity model, and peer models use nominally equivalent models with differing assumptions to derive an uncertainty estimate. These notions will be utilized to quantify model form error in a nonpremixed combustion model and in a subfilter dissipation rate model, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Event2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016 - Princeton, United States
Duration: Mar 13 2016Mar 16 2016

Other

Other2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016
CountryUnited States
CityPrinceton
Period3/13/163/16/16

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

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  • Cite this

    Mueller, M. E., & Raman, V. (2016). Model form uncertainty quantification in turbulent combustion simulations. Paper presented at 2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016, Princeton, United States.