Micro-trench measurements of the net deposition of carbon impurity ions in the DIII-D divertor and the resulting suppression of surface erosion

S. Abe, C. H. Skinner, I. Bykov, J. Guterl, A. Lasa, Y. W. Yeh, J. Coburn, D. L. Rudakov, C. J. Lasnier, H. Q. Wang, A. G. Mclean, T. Abrams, B. E. Koel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report carbon impurity ion incident angles and deposition rates, along with silicon erosion rates, from measurements of micro-engineered trenches on a silicon surface exposed to L-mode deuterium plasmas at the DIII-D divertor. Post exposure ex-situ analysis determined elemental maps and concentrations, carbon deposition thicknesses, and erosion of silicon surfaces. Carbon deposition profiles on the trench floor showed carbon ion shadowing that was consistent with ERO calculations of average carbon ion angle distributions (IADs) for both polar and azimuthal angles. Measured silicon net erosion rates negatively correlated with the deposited carbon concentration at different locations. Differential erosion of surfaces on two different ion-downstream trench slope structures suggested that carbon deposition rate is affected by the carbon ion incident angle and significantly suppressed the surface erosion. The results suggest the C impurity ion incident angles, determined by the IADs and surface morphology, strongly affect erosion rates as well as the main ion (D, T, He) incident angles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number124039
JournalPhysica Scripta
Volume96
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Mathematical Physics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Keywords

  • Carbon Impurity
  • Deposition
  • Divertor
  • Erosion
  • Ion incident angle
  • Plasma-material interaction
  • Surface analysis

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