Measuring self-efficacy, executive function, and temporal discounting in Kenya

Kristina Esopo, Daniel Mellow, Catherine Thomas, Hannah Uckat, Justin Abraham, Prachi Jain, Chaning Jang, Nicholas Otis, Michala Riis-Vestergaard, Amanda Starcev, Kate Orkin, Johannes Haushofer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Developing countries have low adherence to medical regimens like water chlorination or antenatal and postnatal care, contributing to high infant and child mortality rates. We hypothesize that high levels of stress affect adherence through temporal discounting, self-efficacy, and executive control. Measurement of these constructs in developing countries requires adaptation of existing measures. In the current study, we adapt psychological scales and behavioral tasks, measuring each of these three constructs, for use among adults in Kenya. We translated and back-translated each measure to Kiswahili and conducted cognitive interviewing to establish cultural acceptability, refined existing behavioral tasks, and developed new ones. Then, in a laboratory session lasting 3 h, participants (N=511) completed the adapted psychological inventories and behavioral tasks. We report the psychometric properties of these measures. We find relatively low reliability and poor correlational evidence between psychological scales and behavioral tasks measuring the same construct, highlighting the challenges of adapting measures across cultures, and suggesting that assays within the same domain may tap distinct underlying processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-45
Number of pages16
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume101
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Keywords

  • Executive function
  • Measurement
  • Psychometrics
  • Self-efficacy
  • Temporal discounting

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    Esopo, K., Mellow, D., Thomas, C., Uckat, H., Abraham, J., Jain, P., Jang, C., Otis, N., Riis-Vestergaard, M., Starcev, A., Orkin, K., & Haushofer, J. (2018). Measuring self-efficacy, executive function, and temporal discounting in Kenya. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 101, 30-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2017.10.002