Loss of control is not necessary to induce behavioral consequences of deprivation: The case of religious fasting during Ramadan

Mostafa Salari Rad, Jeremy Ginges

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pepper & Nettle argue that the more present-oriented behavior associated with a low socioeconomic status is an adaptive response to having relatively little control over the future. However, a study of fasters during Ramadan shows that self-imposed deprivation, which carries no implications regarding the ability to realize deferred rewards, is associated with loss and risk aversion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e338
JournalThe Behavioral and brain sciences
Volume40
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Loss of control is not necessary to induce behavioral consequences of deprivation: The case of religious fasting during Ramadan'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this