Linear maps

Shuvendu K. Lahiri, Shaz Qadeer, David P. Walker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Verification of large programs is impossible without proof techniques that allow local reasoning and information hiding. In this paper, we take the approach of modeling the heap as a collection of partial functions with disjoint domains. We call each such partial function a linear map. Programmers may select objects from linear maps, update linear maps or transfer addresses and their contents from one linear map to another. Programmers may also declare new linear map variables and pass linear maps as arguments to procedures. The program logic prevents any of these operations from duplicating locations and thereby breaking the key heap representation invariant: the domains of all linear maps remain disjoint. Linear maps facilitate modular reasoning because programs that use them are also able to use simple, classical frame rules to preserve information about heap state across procedure calls. We illustrate our approach through examples, prove that our verification rules are sound, and show that operations on linear maps may be erased and replaced by equivalent operations on a single, global heap.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPLPV'11 - Proceedings of the 5th ACM Workshop on Programming Languages Meets Program Verification
Pages3-14
Number of pages12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 7 2011
Event5th ACM Workshop on Programming Languages Meets Program Verification, PLPV 2011 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: Jan 29 2011Jan 29 2011

Publication series

NamePLPV'11 - Proceedings of the 5th ACM Workshop on Programming Languages Meets Program Verification

Other

Other5th ACM Workshop on Programming Languages Meets Program Verification, PLPV 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period1/29/111/29/11

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications

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