Legitimating racial discrimination: Emotions, not beliefs, best predict discrimination in a meta-analysis

Cara A. Talaska, Susan T. Fiske, Shelly Chaiken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Scopus citations

Abstract

Investigations of racial bias have emphasized stereotypes and other beliefs as central explanatory mechanisms and as legitimating discrimination. In recent theory and research, emotional prejudices have emerged as another, more direct predictor of discrimination. A new comprehensive meta-analysis of 57 racial attitude-discrimination studies finds a moderate relationship between overall attitudes and discrimination. Emotional prejudices are twices as closely related to racial discrimination as stereotypes and beliefs are. Moreover, emotional prejudices are closely related to both observed and self-reported discrimination, whereas stereotypes and beliefs are related only to self-reported discrimination. Implications for justifying discrimination are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-296
Number of pages34
JournalSocial Justice Research
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Attitude
  • Discrimination
  • Emotion
  • Prejudice
  • Race

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