Inverse flash nanoprecipitation for biologics encapsulation: Nanoparticle formation and ionic stabilization in organic solvents

Robert F. Pagels, Robert K. Prud'Homme

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Inverse Flash NanoPrecipitation, or iFNP, is a recently developed scalable, controllable, and reproducible process to produce nanoparticles highly loaded with water soluble molecules, such as biologics. The nanoparticles produced by iFNP have a hydrophilic core and hydrophobic corona, and are dispersed in organic solvents. However, most nanoparticle applications, particularly biomedical applications, require that the particle be stable in aqueous environments. Here, we demonstrate that the size of these "inverted" nanoparticles can be controlled between 40 and 300nm, and that they can be stabilized by ionically gelling the poly(acrylic acid) core with metal cations. The effect of solvent and salt on crosslinking were investigated. A method to evaluate the crosslinking efficiency was developed, and a number of metals were found to be effective at crosslinking the particle core, including Ca2+, Zn2+, and Fe3+. Once stabilized, these particles may be further processed for applications in aqueous environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationControl of Amphiphile Self-Assembling at the Molecular Level
Subtitle of host publicationSupra-Molecular Assemblies with Tuned Physicochemical Properties for Delivery Applications
EditorsMarc A. Ilies
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
Pages249-274
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9780841232747
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Publication series

NameACS Symposium Series
Volume1271
ISSN (Print)0097-6156
ISSN (Electronic)1947-5918

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Inverse flash nanoprecipitation for biologics encapsulation: Nanoparticle formation and ionic stabilization in organic solvents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this