Innovative education in engineering: A social and multi-dimensional exploration of structures

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Teaching engineering was identified as an area in need of improvement in many countries including the USA. While a typical course of structural engineering study focuses mostly on the engineering calculations, the great structures of our society come to existence not only by calculations, but also by (1) knowing and working with the related economic and political circumstances, (2) developing an appropriate and economical construction process, and (3) considering the environmental impacts of such a construction. However, modern educational systems often ignore these additional dimensions of engineering and, as a result, graduate structural engineers have a very narrow vision of their profession. At Princeton University, a new studio course was taught which explores these dimensions through multiple activities. This paper explores and presents an innovative approach for teaching successful engineering design and construction approaches, and discusses its impact to students and potential impacts to society in general.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStructures Congress 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Structures Congress
EditorsGlenn R. Bell, Matt A. Card
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages1126-1137
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9780784413357
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
EventStructures Congress 2014 - Boston, United States
Duration: Apr 3 2014Apr 5 2014

Publication series

NameStructures Congress 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Structures Congress

Other

OtherStructures Congress 2014
CountryUnited States
CityBoston
Period4/3/144/5/14

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Building and Construction
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

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