Information theory meets circuit design: Why capacity-approaching codes require more chip area and power

Pulkit Grover, Andrea Goldsmith, Anant Sahai, Jan Rabaey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is generally thought that good codes, i.e. codes that operate at rates close to capacity and attain low error probabilities, are sophisticated constructions that require high encoding and decoding circuit power. In this paper, we rigorously show that this intuition is correct by deriving an information-theoretic lower bound on power consumption for encoding circuits using communication-complexity techniques. We first lower bound the "VLSI complexity" - measured as the product A wiresl 2 where A wires is the wire-area and l is the number of clock cycles in implementation - for encoding. Using the lower bound on VLSI complexity, we derive a lower bound on power consumption of any fully-parallel encoding implementation for any code, and show that the consumed power must diverge to infinity as the error probability approaches zero. Further, the speed of this divergence increases as the rate approaches channel capacity. We also provide a refinement of an earlier result on VLSI complexity by El Gamal, Greene and Pang, which derives a lower bound on A chipl 2, where A chip is the entire chip area required for encoding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 49th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton 2011
Pages1392-1399
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event2011 49th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton 2011 - Monticello, IL, United States
Duration: Sep 28 2011Sep 30 2011

Publication series

Name2011 49th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton 2011

Other

Other2011 49th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton 2011
CountryUnited States
CityMonticello, IL
Period9/28/119/30/11

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Control and Systems Engineering

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