“I am still thirsty”: A theorization on the authority and cultural location of afrocentrism

Imani Perry

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter considers several of the points of divergence, examining the degree to which the perceived viability of Afrocentricity is dependent on Molefi Kete Asante’s construction and critically inquiring whether his theory is historically optimal or even feasible. Afrocentricity, as postulated by both Asante and the popular culture that rap represents, consciously affirms the African cultural roots of Africans throughout the Diaspora. Critical to both perspectives on Afrocentricity is the reclaiming and embracing of what Asante terms the African Cultural System. Christianity has been dealt with admirably by other writers, notably Karenga; but Islam within the African American community has yet to come under Afrocentric scrutiny. Christianity has been dealt with admirably by other writers, notably Karenga; but Islam within the African American community has yet to come under Afrocentric scrutiny. In addition to claiming historic Christianity, there is a widespread trend among Afrocentric rappers to become members of various branches of Islam.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFreedom’s Plow
Subtitle of host publicationTeaching in the Multicultural Classroom
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages261-270
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781136646782
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Social Sciences

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