Homozygosity for mobile element insertions associated with WBSCR17 could predict success in assistance dog training programs

Dhriti Tandon, Kyra Ressler, Daniel Petticord, Andrea Papa, Juliana Jiranek, Riley Wilkinson, Rebecca Y. Kartzinel, Elaine A. Ostrander, Nathaniel Burney, Carol Borden, Monique A.R. Udell, Bridgett Marie vonHoldt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Assistance dog training programs can see as many as 60% of their trainees dismissed. Many training programs utilize behavioral assays prior to admittance to identify likely successful candidates, yet such assays can be insconsistent. Recently, four canine retrotransposon mobile element insertions (MEIs) in or near genes WBSCR17 (Cfa6.6 and Cfa6.7), GTF2I (Cfa6.66) and POM121 (Cfa6.83) were identified in domestic dogs and gray wolves. Variations in these MEIs were significantly associated with a heightened propensity to initiate prolonged social contact or hypersociability. Using our dataset of 837 dogs, 228 of which had paired survey-based behavioral data, we discovered that one of the insertions in WBSCR17 is the most important predictor of dog sociable behaviors related to human proximity, measured by the Canine Behavioral Assessment Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number439
JournalGenes
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Keywords

  • Canis
  • Domestication
  • Genetics
  • Hypersociability
  • Transposons

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    Tandon, D., Ressler, K., Petticord, D., Papa, A., Jiranek, J., Wilkinson, R., Kartzinel, R. Y., Ostrander, E. A., Burney, N., Borden, C., Udell, M. A. R., & vonHoldt, B. M. (2019). Homozygosity for mobile element insertions associated with WBSCR17 could predict success in assistance dog training programs. Genes, 10(6), [439]. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10060439