Gaining knowledge mediates changes in perception (without differences in attention): A case for perceptual learning

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Abstract

Firestone & Scholl (F&S) assert that perceptual learning is not a top-down effect, because experience-mediated changes arise from familiarity with the features of the object through simple repetition and not knowledge about the environment. Emberson and Amso (2012) provide a clear example of perceptual learning that bypasses the authors' "pitfalls" and in which knowledge, not repeated experience, results in changes in perception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e240
JournalThe Behavioral and brain sciences
Volume39
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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