From textbook pluralism to modern hyperpluralism: Interest groups and supreme court nominations, 1930–2017

Charles M. Cameron, Cody Gray, Jonathan P. Kastellec, Jee Kwang Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examine interest group involvement in Supreme Court nominations from 1930 to 2017, finding dramatic shifts in the number and type of groups, as well as their choice of tactics. Whereas the early period was dominated by labor unions, “core” civil rights groups, and groups affiliated with the “old right,” the modern period is dominated by public interest/citizen groups and “identity” groups. We also find a shift from more traditional “inside” tactics to the heavy use of “outside/grassroots” mobilization tactics. Finally, we show that the calculus of mobilization has increasingly been based on a nominee’s ideology over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-332
Number of pages32
JournalJournal of Law and Courts
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Law

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