First impressions: Making up your mind after a 100-ms exposure to a face

Janine Willis, Alexander Todorov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1080 Scopus citations

Abstract

People often draw trait inferences from the facial appearance of other people. We investigated the minimal conditions under which people make such inferences. In five experiments, each focusing on a specific trait judgment, we manipulated the exposure time of unfamiliar faces. Judgments made after a 100-ms exposure correlated highly with judgments made in the absence of time constraints, suggesting that this exposure time was sufficient for participants to form an impression. In fact, for all judgments - attractiveness, likeability, trustworthiness, competence, and aggressiveness - increased exposure time did not significantly increase the correlations. When exposure time increased from 100 to 500 ms, participants' judgments became more negative, response times for judgments decreased, and confidence in judgments increased. When exposure time increased from 500 to 1,000 ms, trait judgments and response times did not change significantly (with one exception), but confidence increased for some of the judgments; this result suggests that additional time may simply boost confidence in judgments. However, increased exposure time led to more differentiated person impressions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-598
Number of pages7
JournalPsychological Science
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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