False recognition after a right frontal lobe infarction: Memory for general and specific information

Tim Curran, Daniel L. Schacter, Kenneth A. Norman, Lissa Galluccio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

120 Scopus citations

Abstract

We previously reported a case study of a man with right frontal lobe damage, BG, who showed extraordinarily high false alarm rates on remember-know recognition tests. Experiment 1 extends his high false alarm rate to yes-no recognition tests. BG typically gives false 'remember' responses on remember-know tests, and this pattern was uninfluenced when he was asked to explain the basis for his 'remember' responses (Experiments 2 and 3). When BG was given a semantic encoding task, he stopped giving 'remember'-based false alarms (Experiment 4). Signal detection analyses revealed that BG had a discrimination deficit and an abnormally liberal response bias (especially for 'remember' responses) in most conditions. Overall, BG's high false alarm rate is interpreted as reflecting an over-reliance on the general similarity between a test item and the study episode.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1035-1049
Number of pages15
JournalNeuropsychologia
Volume35
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1997
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Keywords

  • Episodic memory
  • False recognition
  • Frontal lobes

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