Experiments in high reynolds number turbulent pipe flow

M. V. Zagarola, A. J. Smits, S. A. Orszag, V. Yakhot

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

An experimental facility was constructed to investigate fully-developed turbulent pipe flow over an unprecedented range of Reynolds numbers (approximately 32 x 103 to 35 x 106 based on average velocity and diameter). The maximum Reynolds number investigated exceeds the highest previously measured by an order of magnitude. To attain high Reynolds numbers at reasonable cost, compressed air (up to 220 aim} was used as the working fluid. The results show that the friction factor depends on Reynolds number logarithmically, as proposed by Prandtl, but a set of new constants are found. The friction factor data show von Kármán's constant to be 0.44. If the velocity profile is normalized using inner scaling variables, a log-law with this slope and an additive constant of 6.3 is in excellent agreement with the data. If the velocity profile is normalized using outer scaling variables, a log-law with this slope and an additive constant of 1.5 is in good agreement with the data. It is also shown that the average velocity occurs at a location approximately 1/4 radius from the wall, independent of Reynolds number.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Event34th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 1996 - Reno, United States
Duration: Jan 15 1996Jan 18 1996

Other

Other34th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 1996
CountryUnited States
CityReno
Period1/15/961/18/96

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Aerospace Engineering

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    Zagarola, M. V., Smits, A. J., Orszag, S. A., & Yakhot, V. (1996). Experiments in high reynolds number turbulent pipe flow. Paper presented at 34th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 1996, Reno, United States.