Expected message delivery time for small-world networks in the continuum limit

Hazer Inaltekin, Mung Chiang, H. Vincent Poor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Small-world networks are networks in which the graphical diameter of the network is as small as the diameter of random graphs but whose nodes are highly clustered when compared with the ones in a random graph. Examples of small-world networks abound in sociology, biology, neuroscience and physics as well as in human-made networks. This paper analyzes the average delivery time of messages in dense smallworld networks constructed on a plane. Iterative equations for the average message delivery time in these networks are provided for the situation in which nodes employ a simple greedy geographic routing algorithm. It is shown that two network nodes communicate with each other only through their shortrange contacts, and that the average message delivery time rises linearly if the separation between them is small. On the other hand, if their separation increases, the average message delivery time rapidly saturates to a constant value and stays almost the same for all large values of their separation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2008 IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, ISIT 2008
Pages667-671
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 29 2008
Event2008 IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, ISIT 2008 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: Jul 6 2008Jul 11 2008

Publication series

NameIEEE International Symposium on Information Theory - Proceedings
ISSN (Print)2157-8101

Other

Other2008 IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, ISIT 2008
CountryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period7/6/087/11/08

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Information Systems
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Applied Mathematics

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