Eviction's fallout: Housing, hardship, and health

Matthew Desmond, Rachel Tolbert Kimbro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Scopus citations

Abstract

Millions of families across the United States are evicted each year. Yet, we know next to nothing about the impact eviction has on their lives. Focusing on lowincome urban mothers, a population at high risk of eviction, this study is among the first to examine rigorously the consequences of involuntary displacement from housing. Applying two methods of propensity score analyses to data from a national survey, we find that eviction has negative effects on mothers in multiple domains. Compared to matched mothers who were not evicted, mothers who were evicted in the previous year experienced more material hardship, were more likely to suffer from depression, reported worse health for themselves and their children, and reported more parenting stress. Some evidence suggests that at least two years after their eviction, mothers still experienced significantly higher rates of material hardship and depression than peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-324
Number of pages30
JournalSocial Forces
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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