Ethnic identity moderates perceptions of prejudice: Judgments of personal versus group discrimination and subtle versus blatant bias

Don Operario, Susan T. Fiske

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

275 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two studies investigate the association between ethnic identity and perceptions of prejudice. Study 1 examined the relationship between ethnic identity and the personal-group discrimination discrepancy (PGD) among ethnic minority and White respondents. High-identified minorities reported increased personal vulnerability to discrimination and less PGD, whereas less-identified minorities conformed more to the PGD phenomenon. Whites also reported more personal than group discrimination, but ethnic identity did not moderate this effect. Study 2 examined minorities 'perceptions of prejudice in an interaction with a White confederate, who displayed either obvious or subtle prejudice. High-identified minorities showed stronger reactions to subtle prejudice than did low-identified minorities, who tended to overlook subtle prejudice. The authors relate findings to principles from stigma research, social identity, and self-categorization theory and suggest that ethnic identity can explain why some minorities perceive prejudice when others do not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)550-561
Number of pages12
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

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