Effects of dose loading conditions and device geometry on the transport and aerosolization in dry powder inhalers: A simulation study

Mostafa Sulaiman, Xiaoyu Liu, Sankaran Sundaresan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The transport and aerosolization of particles are studied in several different dry powder inhaler geometries via Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method (CFD-DEM) simulations. These simulations combine Large Eddy Simulation of gas with Discrete Element Model simulation of all the carrier particles and a representative subset of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particles. The purpose of the study is to probe the dominant mechanism leading to the release of the API particles and to demonstrate the value of the CFD-DEM simulations where one tracks the motion of all the carrier and API particles. Simulations are performed at different inhalation rates and initial dose loading conditions for the screen-haler geometry, a simple cylindrical tube inhaler, and five different geometry modifications that took the form of bumpy walls and baffles. These geometry modifications alter the residence time of the powder sample in the inhaler, pressure drop across the inhaler, the severity of gas-carrier interactions, and the number of collisions experienced by the carrier particles, all of which are quantified. The quality of aerosolization is found to correlate with the average air-carrier slip velocity, while collisions played only a secondary role. Some geometry modifications improved aerosolization quality with very little increase in the pressure drop across the device.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number121219
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmaceutics
Volume610
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Keywords

  • Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • Discrete Element Method
  • Dose loading
  • Dry Powder Inhaler
  • Fine Particle Fraction

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