Effective conductivity, dielectric constant, and diffusion coefficient of digitized composite media via first-passage-time equations

Salvatore Torquato, In Chan Kim, Dinko Cule

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

We generalize the Brownian motion simulation method of Kim and Torquato [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 3892 (1990)] to compute the effective conductivity, dielectric constant and diffusion coefficient of digitized composite media. This is accomplished by first generalizing the first-passage-time equations to treat first-passage regions of arbitrary shape. We then develop the appropriate first-passage-time equations for digitized media: first-passage squares in two dimensions and first-passage cubes in three dimensions. A severe test case to prove the accuracy of the method is the two-phase periodic checkerboard in which conduction, for sufficiently large phase contrasts, is dominated by corners that join two conducting-phase pixels. Conventional numerical techniques (such as finite differences or elements) do not accurately capture the local fields here for reasonable grid resolution and hence lead to inaccurate estimates of the effective conductivity. By contrast, we show that our algorithm yields accurate estimates of the effective conductivity of the periodic checkerboard for widely different phase conductivities. Finally, we illustrate our method by computing the effective conductivity of the random checkerboard for a wide range of volume fractions and several phase contrast ratios. These results always lie within rigorous four-point bounds on the effective conductivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1560-1571
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume85
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1999

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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