Diagnostic analysis of atmospheric moisture and clear-sky radiative feedback in the Hadley Centre and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate models

Richard P. Allan, V. Ramaswamy, A. Slingo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The interannual variability of the hydrological cycle is diagnosed from the Hadley Centre and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate models, both of which are forced by observed sea surface temperatures. The models produce a similar sensitivity of clear-sky outgoing longwave radiation to surface temperature of ∼2 W m-2 K-1, indicating a consistent and positive clear-sky radiative feedback. However, differences between changes in the temperature lapse-rate and the height dependence of moisture fluctuations suggest that contrasting mechanisms bring about this result. The GFDL model appears to give a weaker water vapor feedback (i. e., changes in specific humidity). This is counteracted by a smaller upper tropospheric temperature response to surface warming, which implies a compensating positive lapse-rate feedback.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)ACL 4-1-ACL 4-7
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres
Volume107
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Keywords

  • 1610 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325)
  • 1878 Hydrology: Water/energy interactions
  • 3359 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Radiative processes
  • Climate model
  • Feedback
  • Temperature lapse-rate
  • Water vapor

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Diagnostic analysis of atmospheric moisture and clear-sky radiative feedback in the Hadley Centre and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate models'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this