Development of self-monitoring essential for vocal interactions in marmoset monkeys

Daniel Y. Takahashi, Darshana Narayanan, Asif A. Ghazanfar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

In humans, self-monitoring is essential for conversations [1] and this ability is fully developed only after 2 years of age [2]. How vocal self-monitoring changes over the course of development, how it evolved, and how it is mediated by neural mechanisms are not known. In this study, we use marmoset monkeys to address these issues. We recorded natural vocal exchanges between parent and infant monkeys and looked for evidence of self-monitoring in both the adults and the infants. Our results show that, similar to humans, adult marmosets have the capacity to self-monitor whereas infants do not. Using a computational model of marmoset vocal exchange dynamics [3] we investigated possible neural mechanism underlying the development of self-monitoring. Our model is based on the interactions between three neural structures (representing limbic, motor and auditory regions) with feedback connectivity inspired by published physiological and anatomical data. The simulations show that strengthening the inhibitory connection between auditory and limbic regions drives the development of self-monitoring and, ultimately, adult-like vocal behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2013 IEEE 3rd Joint International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics, ICDL 2013 - Electronic Conference Proceedings
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 31 2013
Event2013 IEEE 3rd Joint International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics, ICDL 2013 - Osaka, Japan
Duration: Aug 18 2013Aug 22 2013

Other

Other2013 IEEE 3rd Joint International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics, ICDL 2013
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period8/18/138/22/13

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

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